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Hazlitt Magazine

The attraction of lunatic balls seems to have come not only from the fear of violence or unpredictability in asylum-dwellers’s behaviour, but from the existential threat of being forced to ponder the blurry distinction between sanity and insanity.— Linda Besner

Features

‘Life Itself Was Following Some Conventions’: An Interview with Mia Hansen-Løve

Talking to the director and co-writer of Eden about authenticity in portraying electronic music on film, refusing to moralize about partying, and the masterpiece that is Showgirls.

Better Sex, Better World

By situating a lesbian love affair in the conventions of classic Hollywood filmmaking, Desert Hearts became a cult favorite.

Murder For Lunch

Now that I was once again omnivorous, I wanted to watch a deer get turned into meat.

Swole Without a Goal

When I started gaining weight, I didn’t just want to get big: I wanted to occupy as much as space as possible.

eses–)

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Features

‘Writing Was Always an Act of Losing Control’: An Interview with Etgar Keret

The author of The Seven Good Years on peace versus compromise, Hebrew Book Week, and how writing fiction is like dreaming.

The Death and Afterlife of Ramona Wilson

Twenty-one years later, a young woman’s murder continues to haunt the people who loved her.

All That Is (Almost) Good (Enough)

Words can’t possibly capture the experience of being a parent, but when you need a name, who do you become?

The Lesson

The fourth and final installment in our fiction series, wherein we’ve asked four authors to write a short story inspired by World War I. Commissioned in partnership with the Globe and Mail.

In this ancient Pompeii, sex was marketed unapologetically, with a directness that would shame the most mercenary of modern advertisers. Independent sex workers used graffiti to advise clients of prices and locations, while erotic frescos functioned as non-verbal signage for brothels, luring in passersby.— Alexandra Kimball

Poetry

Winter

there’s a guy standing beside me
waiting for the bus

guy says
Israel is like a coffee cup

then he wipes his nose
on his sleeve

Israel is like a coffee cup? I say
how?

Hazlitt Books

Song of the Caged Bird

A stint teaching at a writer’s workshop in Ramallah leads the author to examine the Palestinian resistance through the literature that has shaped it. An excerpt from the latest Hazlitt Original.

CP Images
Our Pet Queen

How royalty went from almighty overlords to household mongrels — a new perspective on the monarchy. An excerpt from the latest Hazlitt Original.

Video

Pagelicker 5.0: Andrew Kaufman

Host Robert Dayton makes a cup of hot cocoa for author Andrew Kaufman as they discuss Kaufman’s latest novel, Born Weird, and the many ways in which families both make you and mess you up.