The Thing Around Your Neck

Publisher: Vintage Canada
These twelve dazzling stories from Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie — the Orange Broadband Prize–winning author of Half of a Yellow Sun — are her most intimate works to date.

In these stories Adichie turns her penetrating eye to the ties that bind men and women, parents and children, Nigeria and the United States. In “A Private Experience,” a medical student hides from a violent riot with a poor Muslim woman, and the young mother at the centre of “Imitation” finds her comfortable life in Philadelphia threatened when she learns that her husband has moved his mistress into their Lagos home.

Searing and profound, suffused with beauty, sorrow and longing, this collection is a resounding confirmation of Adichie’s prodigious literary powers.

From the Hardcover edition.


Cell One

The first time our house was robbed, it was our neighbor Osita who climbed in through the dining room window and stole our TV, our VCR, and the Purple Rain and Thriller videotapes my father had brought back from America. The second time our house was robbed, it was my brother...
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1. Cell One:
• “Boys who had grown up watching Sesame Street, reading Enid Blyton, eating cornflakes for breakfast, attending the university staff primary school. . . . were now cutting through the mosquito netting of their neighbors’ windows, sliding out glass louvers, and climbing in...

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"In recounting these people's lives Ms. Adichie demonstrates, as she did in Half of a Yellow Sun, that she is adept at conjuring the unending personal ripples created by political circumstance."
The New York Times

"A dozen note-perfect short stories. . . . One of the most artful writers of the English language."
The Globe and Mail

"Adichie writes with an economy and precision that makes the strange seem familiar. She makes storytelling seem as easy as birdsong."
The Daily Telegraph

"Mesmerizing. . . . This superior collection accentuates the intellect, insight and blistering honesty that have made Adichie a prominent writer of her generation. . . . Her style might be described as enigmatically ordinary; a prose so effortless that the work it does is practically invisible to the eye."
Toronto Star

From the Hardcover edition.