Safe Haven

The Possibility of Sanctuary in an Unsafe World

Publisher: Vintage Canada
“Forgive the assumptions I’m about to make. I’m sure they say much more about me than you. You have a dream of sanctuary too” (p. 21).

“Sanctuary” is a beautiful word: philosophically rich, culturally intriguing and evocative of so much we cherish — protection, safety, contemplation, solitude. But lurking at the edges of this bright concept are some very dark associations: fear, paranoia, the slamming of gates to exclude the threat of other-ness. Whatever the word means to each of us, and whatever our ancestral legacies, the yearning for sanctuary is a malady we all share to varying degrees, a quest that is both our birthright and our affliction.

These are the assertions of award-winning author Larry Gaudet in Safe Haven, an unorthodox and highly engaging work of imaginative non-fiction. Sure to resonate with anyone who has dreamt of escaping from the pressures of the workaday world — that is, all of us — this book is a highly personal, funny and unflinchingly honest investigation of the power and allure of the idea of sanctuary.

Safe Haven begins and ends in the soft fog of coastal Nova Scotia, taking side trips into the ruined shrines of ancient Greece (with a fictional Bayou-born international spy serving as tour guide), journeying by rail through the frozen vistas and forlorn social realities of Canada’s north and dipping into Gaudet’s own Acadian heritage of displacement.

Booking a year for this project, Gaudet moved with his wife, Alison, and their two small boys to a newly constructed barn by the sea in the fictionally named community of Foggy Cove. His intent: to chart the meaning of sanctuary through the ages, using his family’s solitude as an idyllic jumping-off point. But the project becomes far more complicated than he’d envisioned, and far less idyllic. Envying his children who can oversee uncomplicated imaginary civilizations in a sandbox, Gaudet cannot shake the awareness that he is complicit in the very iniquities from which he seeks to shelter his family, from the environmental toll of their septic tank on this ecologically sensitive land, to the wince of a lobster he is about to boil for dinner. He must also contend with the guilt he feels for having hijacked his wife and children, potentially for naught. As Alison’s desire to return to the comforts and stimuli of urban life grows with every month spent in isolation, Gaudet knows their idyllic days in Foggy Cove are numbered.

In his search for the diverse meanings of sanctuary, Gaudet illuminates the dysfunctions and hidden costs of the way we live — and challenges us to find ways to bring down the walls that keep so many of us estranged from our own experiences. Safe Haven is an entertaining and illuminating romp through the fog-shrouded territory of sanctuary through ages and mythologies, guided by an engaging author who is not afraid to shine the light directly on his own fallable and highly likeable self.


From the Hardcover edition.

READ AN EXCERPT

Sanctuary in the fog (Ghosting)

Foggy Cove, June ­2006

In my travels, I’ve developed a fondness for older neighbourhoods that celebrate the diffuse and unseen, the spooky both planned and improvised. The French Quarter. The Dorobanti in Bucharest. Venice. ­Vieux-­Montréal....
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READING GUIDE

1. “Forgive the assumptions I’m about to make. I’m sure they say much more about me than you. You have a dream of sanctuary too” (p. 21). Is Gaudet correct? What does sanctuary mean to you? What did sanctuary mean to your ancestors?

2. “But sanctuary is a story that belongs to...

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PRAISE FOR

The exact nature of what this estimable writer offers matters less than the fact that he offers it at all – intelligently, vulnerably, often poetically. In so doing, he provides his readers with their own artful version of sanctuary – for me one of the most sacred of cocoons, the stimulations and entertainment of a fine book.” –The Globe and Mail

“An idiosyncratic work that combines personal memoir, history, and philosophical rumination.” –Walrus

"an ambitious, exuberant and beautifully crafted romp of a book that explores the history and philosophy of sanctuary" -Montreal Gazette

"a ruggedly philosophical, at time humorous..examination of sanctuary and a surprisingly self-critical portrait of one man's pursuit of this elusive ideal." -Halifax Chronicle-Herald


From the Hardcover edition.