So Much Love

Publisher: McClelland & Stewart
Olive Kitteridge meets Room and The Lovely Bones in this stunning first novel about the unexpected reverberations the abduction of a young woman has on a small community.

When Catherine Reindeer vanishes from the parking lot outside the restaurant where she works, an entire community is shattered. Moving back and forth from her outer circle of acquaintances to her closest intimates, So Much Love reveals how an unexpected disappearance can overturn the lives of those left behind: Catherine’s fellow waitress now sees danger all around her. Her mother seeks comfort in saying her name over and over again. Her professor finds himself thinking of her constantly. Her husband refuses to give up hope that she will one day return. But at the heart of the novel is Catherine’s own surprising story of resilience and recovery. When, after months of captivity, a final devastating loss forces her to make a bold decision, she is unprepared for everything that follows. 
A riveting novel that deftly examines the complexity of love and the power of stories to shape our lives, So Much Love confirms Rebecca Rosenblum’s reputation as one of the most gifted and distinctive writers of her generation.

READ AN EXCERPT

It seems disloyal after all these years, but I’ve got to start buying different mascara. The Lancôme one I’ve always used wears so nice and soft—heavy makeup makes a woman my age look like a harri­dan—but it isn’t waterproof, and I’ve been crying all spring.
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PRAISE FOR

Praise for Rebecca Rosenblum:
 • "A writer who's intent on probing the mysteries of self and other through the related mysteries of fiction. . . . Rosenblum's work impels us to a fresh experiencing of life." -- Globe and Mail
 • "[Her stories are] at once compressed, poetic, and precise. . . . Rosenblum can register the aching and melancholic, but with a remarkable lack of sentimentality. . . . [She is] a young author of singular talent." -- The Walrus
 • "Rosenblum cuts as close to the bone as possible in her construction of sentences, paring away all but the most essential words." -- National Post