Harry Hole Series

The Thirst

A Harry Hole Novel

Publisher: Random House Canada
#1 International Best Seller 

In this electrifying new thriller from the author of Police and The Snowman, Inspector Harry Hole hunts down a serial murderer who targets his victims . . . on Tinder.
 
The murder victim, a self-declared Tinder addict. The one solid clue—fragments of rust and paint in her wounds—leaves the investigating team baffled.
        Two days later, there’s a second murder: a woman of the same age, a Tinder user, an eerily similar scene. 
        The chief of police knows there’s only one man for this case. But Harry Hole is no longer with the force. He promised the woman he loves, and he promised himself, that he’d never go back: not after his last case, which put the people closest to him in grave danger.
        But there’s something about these murders that catches his attention, something in the details that the investigators have missed. For Harry, it’s like hearing “the voice of a man he was trying not to remember.” Now, despite his promises, despite everything he risks, Harry throws himself back into the hunt for a figure who haunts him, the monster who got away.

STARRED REVIEW 
"Exceptional . . . Nesbo depicts a heartbreakingly conflicted Harry, who both wants to forget the horrors he’s trying to prevent and knows he has to remember them in all their grim detail."
--Publishers Weekly

READ AN EXCERPT

Prologue

He stared into the white nothingness. 

The way he had done for almost three years. 

No one saw him, and he saw no one. Apart from each time the door opened and enough steam was sucked out for him to be able to glimpse a naked man for a brief moment before the door closed and...
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PRAISE FOR

Winner of the 2017 Nordic Noir Thriller of the Year Award

“His outstanding series featuring Detective Inspector Harry Hole has secured Jo Nesbo the undisputed position of Scandinavia’s leading crime writer.” —Nordic Noir Thriller of the Year Award citation

“[V]ery good, one of Nesbo’s best. . . . Gory, disturbing, nightmare-inducing and terrific.” —The Times
 
“It’s a big-boned, technicolour epic in the current Nesbo style, starting adagio and ending accelerando, but with the kind of close psychological character readings that distinguished his early work.” —The Guardian
 
“An extremely gruesome journey to the darker recesses of human nature, this grisly treat will delight Nesbo’s fans.” —Sunday Mirror (UK)
 
“Excellent . . . it rocks.” —Metro (UK)
 
“Gripping from the get-go, deliciously dark and expertly plotted, this is Nesbo at his brilliant best.” —Heat (UK)
 
“[D]eliciously dark.” —The Telegraph
 
“[R]eaders can rejoice that one of the most iconic protagonists of modern crime fiction is back on the beat. . . . In his eleventh book featuring Hole, Nesbo deepens the already-complex portrait of his antihero. . . . Nesbo creates a fine balance between action and tension, with surprises lurking in unexpected corners that provide an edgy and visceral read. He’s a master of structure, style and no-pages-wasted plotting. But Nesbo’s greatest strength as a novelist is the way he places two opposing forces in battle: the perverse criminal and the compulsive detective. In Nesbo’s consistently excellent Hole series, The Thirst may well be the pinnacle.” —Paste
 
The Thirst begins with the brutal killer sinking rusty metal teeth into a victim’s neck, and with that gruesome murder, you’ll want to sink your teeth into The Thirst and not let go.” —The Times of Northwest Indiana
 
“Jo Nesbo has ripped the throat out of the serial-killer genre. He’s exsanguinated it, soaking up every dark pleasure and wringing them out onto the page. There’s no need to ever read another one, Nesbo has so completely deconstructed the trope with a multi-dimensional novel that blurs lines among crime, psychological, procedural and, yes, horror thrillers. . . . [B]rilliant, shifting narrative. . . . Nesbo has a penchant for doing what few writers dare . . . So when the threat comes in The Thirst, you know anything is possible. . . . The Thirst ends with a tantalizing promise and a new threat. What’s coming will be dark and bloody, that much is certain. In the meantime, readers can clear their shelves of serial-killer books. Thomas Harris, Stieg Larsson, John Sandford. Might as well use them as door stops. Unless you are intentionally seeking disappointment. Because after this one, they just won’t compare.” —Robert Anglen, The Arizona Republic
 
“What distinguishes Jo Nesbo . . . is his wry sense of humour. He not only provides a super-complex plot with plenty of twists (two within the first twelve pages) but also skillfully continues the lives of the all-too-fallible characters we have grown to love and hate.” —London Evening Standard

“The eleventh case for Harry Hole is well worth sinking your teeth into. . . . In the end the reason to come back for more is the sheer magnetism of Harry Hole. . . . The Thirst, like its stablemates, is a bulky but zippy 500-pager which never loiters in one place for long. Nesbo keeps you guessing with his usual bag of tricks, making everyone seem a little suspect (or almost everyone). His cynicism about bent coppers and unscrupulous journalists is an inexhaustible and entertaining sideshow. . . . In short, if you liked the other ten, you’ll greedily sink your teeth into this. And maybe by the time it appears in paperback many more millions will have been sold.” —The Arts Desk

“[E]xpertly plotted with vividly drawn characters, frenetic police chases and philosophising villains, not to mention the usual bonus add-ons that are part and parcel of Nesbo’s thrillers. Esoteric science, ancient murder lore and indie music play their parts. . . . Expect to be thoroughly entertained.” —Crime Fiction Lover (blog)

“The juxtaposition of the stunningly beautiful natural world and the savagery of the crimes can be alarming; towns and communities defiled. The infection is insidious. The clash between the raging, vengeful, deviant criminal and the flawed, conflicted, struggling protagonist is gripping and exhausting. Layers and subtext, nuance and shading: these books are engaging and addictive and unsettling. Quaint whodunits, these are not.” —Hometown Pasadena