Code Name Verity

Publisher: Doubleday Canada
The book The New York Times called "a fiendishly plotted mind game of a novel" is now available in paperback!
     Two young women from totally different backgrounds are thrown together during the Second World War. One is a working-class girl from Manchester, the other a Scottish aristocrat; one is a pilot, the other a wireless operator. Yet whenever their paths cross, they complement each other perfectly, and before long they are devoted friends. But then a vital mission goes wrong, and one of the friends has to bail out of a faulty plane over France. She is captured by the Gestapo and becomes a prisoner of war. The story begins in "Verity's" own words, as she writes her account for her captors.

PRAISE FOR

Shortlisted for the Carnegie Medal

“Between this and her follow-up, Rose Under Fire, Wein is revealing herself to be a new master of young adult historical fiction. . . . Filled with twists and turns, Code Name Verity is not for the faint of heart.”
Rolling Stone

“This heart-in-your-mouth adventure has it all: a complex plot, a vivid sense of place and time, and resonant themes of friendship and courage. Practical Maddie and mischievous Julie are brought to life through their vibrant narrative voices and intriguing backstories . . . In this powerful work of historical fiction, Julie and Maddie need never fear ‘flying alone’; the reader will soar with them until the final page.”
The Washington Post
 
“Young people will enjoy this Second World War spy story, no doubt, but its appeal is much wider. It's a beautiful thriller about friendship, courage and daring at a desperate time.”
The StarPhoenix
 
“Moving back in time, rather than forward, Code Name Verity by Elizabeth Wein is an original, cleverly written Second World War story about spies, torture, women pilots, friendship and the horror of war.”
The Independent

“A carefully researched, precisely written tour de force; unforgettable and wrenching.”
Kirkus Reviews (starred review)
 
“[Code Name Verity] is outstanding in all its features—its warm, ebullient characterization; its engagement with historical facts; its ingenious plot and dramatic suspense; and its intelligent, vivid writing.”
The Horn Book (starred review)

“A fiendishly plotted mind game of a novel.”
The New York Times Book Review

“If you pick up this book, it will be some time before you put your dog-eared, tear-stained copy back down. Wein succeeds on three fronts: historical verisimilitude, gut-wrenching mystery, and a first-person voice of such confidence and flair that the protagonist might become a classic character. . . . Both crushingly sad and hugely inspirational, this plausible, unsentimental novel will thoroughly move even the most cynical of readers.”
Booklist Online (American Library Association)

“This book is written in a brilliant way. . . . Elizabeth Wein makes it always be believable and realistic as it is from the point of view of a young woman. . . . By the end, I was sobbing. . . . I would rate it a 10/10, for being so amazing and intriguing. . . . I think everyone should read this incredible and heart wrenching story of two girls.”
The Guardian (UK)

“Everyone should read this book. Everyone, everyone, everyone. . . . It will, in certain moments, emotionally destroy you, put you back together again, and leave you slightly unable to function as a person after you’ve finished it. But in a good way. In the sort of way where you’re really glad you read it, and want everyone you know to read it as well. . . . It is unlike anything I have ever read, full of pain and bravery and friendship. . . . Run to the bookstore right now.”
Feminist Fiction

 “This book enthralled me from the opening words. . . . What a fabulous book. Made up of equal parts Nancy Drew, Girl Scout and Steve McQueen, these girls show just how much they took on, and how much they were capable of doing, during the war while the men were away. . . . The layers run deep. . . . Suffice it to say that if you are a fan of intrigue, war and strong females. . . you will not be disappointed.”
Ink and Page