The Troubled Man

Publisher: Vintage Canada
From the author most recently of the bestselling, internationally acclaimed thriller The Man from Beijing — comes the first Kurt Wallander mystery in more than a decade: the much-anticipated return of the brilliant, brooding detective.

On a winter's day in 2008, Hakån von Enke, a retired high-ranking naval officer, disappears during his daily walk in a forest near Stockholm. The investigation into his disappearance falls under the jurisdiction of the Stockholm Police, but Wallander is personally affected: Enke is his beloved daughter, Linda's, father-in-law. Before long, in his inimitable way, Wallander is interfering in matters that are not his responsibility, making promises he has no intention of keeping, telling lies when it suits him, paying little attention to normal procedure (including the law) — and, unlike the other detectives on the case, getting results. But the results seem to be pointing to elaborate Cold War espionage activities that confound even this master detective and grow more confounding the more he uncovers. The "troubled man" of the title is not just Enke, but also Wallander himself. The delighted grandfather of Linda's newborn daughter, he is nonetheless obsessed with his physical and mental deterioration, negligent of his health and certain that at age sixty, he's on the threshold of senility. Haunted by his past, desperate to live up to the hope that his granddaughter presents him with, facing the future with profound uncertainty, Wallander will be forced to come face to face with his most intractable adversary: himself. Suspenseful, darkly atmospheric, psychologically gripping, The Troubled Man is Henning Mankell at his mesmerizing best.

From the Hardcover edition.


The year Kurt Wallander celebrated his fifty-fifth birthday, he fulfilled a long-held dream. Ever since his divorce from Mona fifteen years earlier, he had intended to leave his apartment in Mariagatan, where so many unpleasant memories were etched into the walls, and move out to the country. Every time he came home in the...
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A New York Times Notable Crime Book of 2011

“A successful stand-alone book. . . . Compelling.”
— Janet Maslin, The New York Times
“A magnificent finale; it’s to be hoped that Mankell may be persuaded to revive his grumpy Nordic inspector, complete with his stomach cramps, failing eyesight and Ikea furniture. He is far too good to lose.”
— Financial Times
“Wallander . . . has become one of the best-loved of all detectives. . . . The Troubled Man delivers in full as a whodunit, as all the Wallander books do. . . . The Troubled Man is a sorrowful––how could it not be?––but fully satisfying conclusion to a great series. No Mankell reader will think of missing it.”
— The Scotsman
The Troubled Man is a first-rate whodunnit. But it’s also a quiet, considered and respectful farewell; a meditation on a life honestly if imperfectly lived.”
The Guardian
“Readers whose knowledge of Scandinavian crime fiction goes beyond Stieg Larsson know that it was Henning Mankell who jump-started what has developed into a twenty-year Golden Age. Mankell’s latest novel, the final volume in the Kurt Wallander series, represents a landmark moment in the genre comparable to the swan songs of Ian Rankin’s John Rebus and John Harvey’s Charlie Resnick. . . . Always a reticent man, Wallander shows an intensity of emotion here, a last gasp of felt life, that is both moving and oddly inspiring. An unforgettable series finale.”
— Booklist (starred review)
Praise for Henning Mankell:

“To his legions of North American readers, Henning Mankell is the unrivalled master of Swedish crime fiction and one of the finest practitioners of the genre anywhere.”
 — Toronto Star
“Mankell, like Stieg Larsson, appreciates the secrets and the sin lurking beneath all that pristine Swedish snow.” 
 — Maureen Corrigan, NPR
“For me, Henning Mankell is by far the best writer of police mysteries today. He is in the great tradition of those whose works transcend their chosen genre to become thrilling and moral literature.”
 — Michael Ondaatje
“Henning Mankell . . . kicked open the door for the Nordic whodunit. Mankell’s lugubrious Swedish detective, Inspector Kurt Wallander, is one of the most impressive creations in crime fiction today. Grumpy detectives are a staple of the genre, and Wallander is fabulously grumpy.”
 — The Guardian