Losing Nelson

Publisher: Anchor

Barry Unsworth’s Losing Nelson is a novel of obsession, the story of a man unable to see himself separately from the hero he mistakenly idolizes Admiral Lord Nelson. Charles Cleasby is, in fact, a Nelson biographer run amok. He is convinced that Nelson—Britain's greatest admiral, who finally defeated Napoleon, and lost his own life, in the Battle of Trafalgar—is the perfect hero, but in his research he has come upon an incident of horrifying brutality in Nelson's military career that simply stumps all attempts at glorification.

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I had a bad fright that morning. I wouldn't have left the house at all on such a special day if the man at Seldon's hadn't phoned to say they had a piece I might be interested in. It was an oval plate, bone china, frilled at the edges, slightly curved at the sides, pale cream in colour, with a central medallion enclosing...
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PRAISE FOR

"Losing Nelson may be Barry Unsworth's best book to date; it is accomplished, effective, exciting and intelligent...Information is cunningly deployed, the pace perfectly controlled, the mood of zealous desperation, of exhilarated misery, is heightened from page to page."        
--The Sunday Times (London)

Sacred Hunger, winner of the Booker Prize:

"Wonderful and breathtaking...It is a book of grace and meditative elegance, and of great moral seriousness."
--The New York Times Book Review

"Utterly magnificent...By its last page you will be weeping."
--The Washington Post

Morality Play, a national bestseller, shortlisted for the Booker Prize and a New York Times Notable Book:

"A book of subtlety, compassion, and skill, and it confirms Barry Unsworth's position as a master craftsman of contemporary British fiction."
--Los Angeles Times Book Review

"A bravura performance...A thought-provoking comedy on the eternal sameness of disaster and the recurrent uses we put it to in art."
--The New York Times Book Review

After Hannibal:

"From its start as a deceptively simple, possibly amusing tale of a neighborhood squabble about a damaged wall, After Hannibal builds into a brilliant novel, exquisitely precise in its analysis of evil twisting its way through ordinary lives."
--Boston Globe

"A skillfully composed and beautifully written novel."
--Times Literary Supplement