Black Tide

A Jack Irish Thriller

Publisher: Anchor Canada
Jack Irish – gambler, lawyer, finder of missing people – is recovering from a foray into the criminal underworld when he agrees to look for the missing son of Des Connors, the last living link to Jack’s father.

It’s an offer he soon regrets. As Jack begins his search, he discovers that prodigal sons sometimes go missing for a reason. Gary Connors was a man with something to hide, and his trail leads Jack to millionaire and political kingmaker Steven Levesque, a man harboring a deep and deadly secret.

Black Tide, the second book in Peter Temple’s celebrated Jack Irish series, takes us back into a brilliantly evoked world of pubs, racetracks, and sports – not to mention intrigue, corruption, and violence.

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In the late autumn, down windy streets raining yellow oak and elm leaves, I went to George Armit’s funeral. It was a small affair. Almost everyone George had known was dead. Many of them were dead because George had had them killed.

My occasional employer and I sat in my old Studebaker Lark a little way down...
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PRAISE FOR

“The joint U.S. release of Bad Debts and Black Tide, the first two entries in his series starring burned-out Melbourne solicitor Jack Irish, make for an excellent introduction to Temple’s clever, irresistibly entertaining thrillers.”
Time Out New York

Praise for Peter Temple:
“Hallelujah. Jack Irish is back. . . . A fast, funny, fabulous thriller.”
Adelaide Advertiser

“This is a highly complex and magnificently crafted thriller from a top-drawer practitioner. To my mind Temple has the magic touch: He is deft, dry, sharp-eyed, inventive.”
Australian Book Review

“Temple is as dark and mean, as cool and as mesmerizing, as any James Ellroy or Elmore Leonard with whom you might kill the small or sad hours.”
The Age

“. . .reminiscent of Robert Ludlum or Tom Clancy. . . . The author adroitly weaves the story together and neatly ties up all loose ends so readers feel a sense of satisfaction when the tale concludes.”
Omaha Pulp