If I Loved You, I Would Tell You This

Fiction

Publisher: Random House Trade Paperbacks
FINALIST FOR THE FRANK O’CONNOR SHORT STORY AWARD

NOW WITH AN ADDITIONAL STORY

Heralding the arrival of a stunning new voice in American fiction, If I Loved You, I Would Tell You This takes readers into the minds and hearts of people navigating the unsettling transitions that life presents to us all: A father struggles to forge an independent identity as his blind daughter prepares for college. A mother comes to terms with her adult daughter’s infidelity. An artist mourns the end of a romance while painting the portrait of a dying man. Brilliant, hopeful, and fearlessly honest, If I Loved You, I Would Tell You This illuminates the truths of human relationships, truths we come to recognize in these characters and in ourselves. 

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Chapter One

The Guide

At seventeen, Jack Snyder’s daughter is slender- faced and long of limb and still able to startle her father with her seeming certainty about everything she thinks. They’re driving along roads he doesn’t yet know, on their way to meet her first seeing-eye dog,...
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READING GUIDE

1. The title of this book is If I Loved You, I Would Tell You This.  What are some instances in the stories of people deciding which secrets to tell and which to keep?  What goes into these decisions?  For example, in “Immortalizing John Parker,” why does Clara finally tell Harold about...

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PRAISE FOR

“Incisive.”—People
 
“Powerful.”—San Francisco Chronicle
 
“Pitch-perfect.”—O: The Oprah Magazine
 

“Sparkling.”—The Philadelphia Inquirer
 
“Original and surprising.”—Chicago Tribune

“So deft, so understated, and so compelling . . . Fans of Mary Gaitskill, Amy Bloom, and Miranda July will feel like they’ve found gold in a river when they discover Robin Black.” —O: The Oprah Magazine

“Each story reads like a mini-novel. . . . Worlds are contained in a single page. And the writing . . . oh, the writing.”—San Francisco Chronicle

“Characters so fully imagined you’ll feel they’re in the room.”—People
 
“Powerful and touching . . . sparkling with poetic vision.”—The Philadelphia Inquirer
 
“Exquisitely distilled tales of loss and reckoning.”—Vogue