A Sergeants Sueño and Bascom Novel

Buddha’s Money

Publisher: Soho Crime
This grisly, terrifying thriller follows CID Agents George Sueño and Ernie Bascom across the Korean Peninsula in their search for a lost artifact

South Korea, 1970s: Retired Army officer Herman Burkowicz has quite a lucrative setup smuggling rare Korean artifacts. But then his nine-year-old foster daughter, Mi-ja, is abducted, and her kidnappers demand a ransom Burkowicz doesn’t have: a priceless jade skull from the age of Genghis Khan. Sueño and Bascom—more accustomed to chasing felons and black marketeers in the back alleys of Itaewon than ancient treasures—go in over their heads as they agree to search for the skull, a journey that will lead them to a crime that threatens the fragile peace between South Korea and the US Army units living on its Korean soil.


Praise for Buddha's Money

“The locations . . . are as amazingly vivid as ever, and his wild men heroes are just as good company.”
Los Angeles Times

“Fast and confident . . . Well-drawn and vivid.”
The Seattle Times 

“A slam-bang thriller. . . . Limón keeps the action coming at a furious pace.”
Albuquerque Journal 

Praise for the George Sueño and Ernie Bascom series

“Easily the best military mysteries in print today.”
—Lee Child 
“Limón, who was stationed in Korea for the Army, writes with empathy for the Korean people as well for the young GIs dropped into a foreign culture.”
The Boston Globe
“It is not often that so impressive a debut as Jade Lady Burning appears . . . Compassionately written, searing in its intensity. Without ever trying to be ‘literary,’ this novel achieves the stature of literature.”
The New York Times Book Review
“[Limón] vividly contrasts adventures in the seamy side of Seoul’s nightlife with a sensitive appreciation for Korea’s ancient culture.”
The Seattle Times
“This series is a must not only for procedural fans, but also for anyone who enjoys crime fiction set in distinctive international locales.”
Booklist, Starred Review
“Excellent . . . A vivid view of Asia, from the Demilitarized Zone to the Yellow Sea, and an insightful look at the era.”
Publishers Weekly, Starred Review
“[The Ville Rat’s] searing portrait of the sins of our recent past bids fair to transcend the genre.” 
—Kirkus Reviews